You Visited Here Looking For Hamsters?

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I really don’t want to sound ungrateful that a search engine “sometimes” might be more than a little misleading when listing my blog or one of my posts in the search results. That’s what we do, right, we search the Internet for the topic we seek and weed through the results, right? Well, I know that is how I do it anyway. I received a very interesting email from a new follower who was sent here by “mistake” thanks to Internet search results. She says she was looking for information on hamsters such as health issues, lifespan, care, and habitat. She says she was very excited to see, in the search results, that someone had done a blog post about the very things she had questions about. To say she was disturbed and equally disappointed when she started reading would be a grand understatement because the post she read was about how I raised gerbils and hamsters as live food for my snakes. The post did, however, cover the information she was seeking, as I had written about the quality of the small mammals as a great protein packed meal which was very safe and clean for reptiles such as pythons to consume. I did write about habitat, diseases, lifespan, and how I raised them as a food source, not as pets.

As she continued to read the post she explained that she became oddly intrigued by my “writing style” and how I seemed to care for my animals. Becoming sidetracked now, she began to read other posts and came to the conclusions that this blog wasn’t exactly about hamsters at all, that it was just some guy writing about different things in his life. Which is true, real life beats fiction hands down every single fucking time. But, her email wasn’t all about blowing rose petals up my skirt, she also had a few very direct questions about my “content”. As polite as she was, she had a point to make. Her main one was that she likes the way I paint the picture, how I try to place the reader in the ” scene “, but can in my words that I limit what or how I say things which kills the whole story for her. Not everyone has a great graphic imagination, if they can’t ” see” it then it is hard to follow for many. She continued to explain she sees that I have written about my haters a bit, reminding me she is a fan and not a hater, before she says that I should write to share, yes, but on my terms, not the haters.

Long story short, there is something to be learned here in the twisted way life gives lessons and that is that you will never know what is behind door #1 if you don’t open the damn door. So very true here as it is in life. Here she came looking for something about hamsters and found out that they are a proper food source for pythons as well as great little pets. She tells me she likes the bartender stories, although she has only read a few, and what I’ve written about the VA since she has a few family members that have all but given up on their own fight. I guess the moral to this whole story is about scratching past the surface, peeling back the layers, and maybe find something you had no intention looking for in the first place. I mean, that is the reason we search the internet is it not, looking for something we didn’t know. Often I wish life itself had a search button, but then life would be to easy wouldn’t it. In fact, I’ve been wondering lately if life smokes after it fucks me or is life just a smiler, waiting for gratitude for the hard screw. I will probably never know!

They Floated Down From The Sky

I like to share stories with y’all that leave me with more questions than answers. Why? Perhaps y’all might be thinking the same thing or y’all might have the answers I seek. Sometimes the story is just too damn bizarre not to share with y’all. So, my basic questions are these. One, what does it look like when it’s raining 2000 dead mice? Two, how does 2000 individual mice feed the expected 2 million brown snakes? Three, am I too believe that only the targeted brown snakes will eat this free meal that has fallen from the sky? Four, what will the collateral damage to other species of wildlife or humans be? Five, how would you react if you looked up and saw a real life dead mouse plague raining down on you? Gives new reasons never to look up with your mouth open, doesn’t it?

Anyway, here’s the story that has me having way too many questions.

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Back in the 1950s, brown tree snakes arrived in Guam, and thought “Ah, paradise.” They have thrived on the small island, which is now home to something like 2 million of them — much to the chagrin of local birds and the U.S. military, which has to deal with regular snake-caused power failures at the Andersen Air Force Base. So the Air Force is sending in the mice. NBC News reports:

They floated down from the sky Sunday — 2,000 mice, wafting on tiny cardboard parachutes … the rodent commandos didn’t know they were on a mission: to help eradicate the brown tree snake, an invasive species that has caused millions of dollars in wildlife and commercial losses since it arrived a few decades ago. That’s because they were dead. And pumped full of painkillers.

Brown tree snakes have two weakness: tasty mice and acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol. For the snakes, acetaminophen is fatal. So the military dosed the dead mice with the drug and blanketed the forest with them. Ideally, the snakes will eat the drugged mice and die. And the dead mice will be memorialized forever in this unlikely triumph of prey over predator.

Original story & picture found @ Grist.org 

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